Still horrified…



Three months ago, I wrote about several injustices that were really getting to me.  


One of them was the fact that despite the passage of 18 months since the January 12, 2010, earthquake in Haiti, hundreds of thousands of Haitians, particularly in the capital, Port-au-Prince, were still living in deplorable conditions under tarps and in tents.


A second one was the fact that human trafficking is the second largest global organized crime today, generating approximately US $31.6 billion each year.  That’s the size of the budget of Nigeria in 2010.


Fast forward to today.  I’m reading Jeff Goins‘s blog and am blindsided by a report that a Haitian orphanage had been trafficking the children entrusted to its care.

Photo credit:  Megan Boudreaux

How low can one go?  


It often seems that the nightmare that is daily life for so many Haitians has no intention of ending.  From the earthquake, the cholera outbreak, and death and damage from hurricanes and tropical storms, to the relentless rainy season, political unrest, and the rising yet underreported phenomena of restavek, (poor children sent to work for wealthier relatives or families under what are often shocking conditions)Haiti’s woes seem interminable.

 
But back to the orphanage.  Seeing two of my great concerns–the situation in Haiti and human trafficking–merging horribly in the lives of helpless little children living on an island not too far from my own … well, it truly broke my heart.  
 
How can people be so heartless to their own people?  How can they break the trust placed in them as caretakers of little ones who have precious little in the first place, as well as the trust of those who in good faith sent money for the upkeep of the orphanage and the care of the children?
 
And, even more important, what do we do in response?  
 
1.  Pray.  Pray for the remaining 75 children in the orphanage, for their health, for their safety, and for a better future than the one they’re facing right now.
 
2.  Act.  Go to Jeff Goins‘ blog or Seth Barnes‘ blog and then share the information they provide on your preferred social media, especially Twitter and Facebook.  Sign the petition they have set up so that the news media can give the story the coverage it desperately needs and the corruption that is feeding this travesty can be unmasked.
 
3.  Stay alert.  Hosea 4:6 states that we are destroyed for lack of knowledge.  The more we know about trafficking and the signs that it is going on around us, the more we can make a dent in the Goliath that it has become.  Check back with those blogs for updated information and be willing to share it with others.
 
 

Comments

  1. Joyce Meyer is also a big proponent for ending human trafficking. She runs the Hand of Hope. Check it out if you haven't.

    I'm going to check out these 2 blogs and then go wash my hair. I gotta get ready for tomorrow's Curly Nikki event 🙂

  2. @Michelle @Radiant Brown BeautyYes, Joyce was one of the first persons I ever heard speak out about trafficking and similar activity. She and Natalie Grant and Christine Caine are really female pioneers in raising the issue in the Christian community.

    Enjoy Curly Nikki! Looking forward to an update!

  3. This is so upsetting. Thanks for the reminders. This is something I want to learn more about this year — and I want to take action!

  4. Thanks for giving clear action steps. And for your heart.

  5. @DeidraThanks Deidra. This sort of abuse always gets to me. Mercifully the orphanage was closed yesterday. God is listening!

  6. This is so sad that we have to worry about these things. In my job we have a specific training every year about human trafficing. It always seems so absurd but then you hear these storries and realize that the training and anything to promot awareness is necessary.

  7. @Chasing JoyIt absolutely is! This practice is almost epidemic now, and to prey on children and women in particular is sickening to me.

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge